Humanity & Hope United Foundation

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Humanity & Hope United was born in 2010 to help people overcome challenges and grow to become their best selves. We started simply—working hand-in-hand with people to get clean water, create jobs, and create access to education. And our mission remains the same today.

We now work with villages in a number of areas throughout Honduras, focusing not on issues but people. We believe that opportunity creates opportunity, so we focus the majority of our time and resources on empowering those we serve.

Above all, our story has taught us that love is the key ingredient to sustainable change. That means we work as a family, we listen to each other, we have patience with each other, we look for the best in each other, and we never give up on each other.


Mission & VISION

Mission

Our mission is to empower people through self-directed, sustainable change in six key areas: infrastructure, economy, community, health, education, and leadership.

Vision

Our vision is that the people we serve grow into the fullest version of themselves and use their unique gifts to serve others.


OUR FOUNDER'S STORY

The moments that change our lives rarely announce themselves. This was true for our founder, Riley Fuller, as he stepped off a bus in rural Honduras in 2007. To say his arrival was unlikely would be an understatement. He arrived in Honduras on a relief trip with his family, forced to go because he’d wrecked his dad’s car when he skipped the trip the year before. Riley is open about where he was personally: 

Before that first trip to Honduras, I knew nothing about putting myself in someone else’s shoes. I was blind and selfish, I had no idea how much struggle and heartache happened throughout the world, and I didn’t know how much human potential was being wasted. I also didn’t know how much we could do to change it if we worked together.
— Riley Fuller, President & Co-founder

Stepping off that bus, Riley saw a house using a plastic tarp to keep rain out. Printed on the tarp were the words “Delta Trash.” That moment changed everything for Riley. Here was a family facing not only food deprivation, dirty water, high local crime, education ending at 6th grade, and an income of less than $2 per day—they also lived in a house literally labeling them “trash.” Riley says, “None of it made sense to me, and I became furious. I had no idea why I had won the birth lottery, but I knew I had to use what I’d been given to help people who were suffering.”